1. Balance Your Strengths

If posture reflects strengths and weaknesses, you can positively affect it by getting your muscles into better balance and, for most people, that means training the posterior line a bit more (calves, hamstrings, glutes, back—all of these muscles are connected along the posterior chain). They usually need a little more attention than their anterior counterparts to keep the body in balance.

TIP: Add more Romanian Deadlifts to target the hamstrings, even if you already have regular concentric deadlifts in your program

2. Train Half-Kneeling Positions

If you’ve got chronically tight hamstrings, you cannot touch your toes, or your lower back is tight after runs, the timing of your hips could be off.

Half-kneeling positions help correct this issue in the long run, but they also require you to squeeze your glutes in order to stay balanced. You can row, press, chop, and push— all with one knee down.

Hannah is proof our programs work !

3. Stretch and Activate Your Hip Flexors Before Training

When you sit or wear heels all day, the hips can end up very rotated in response to the stress. In turn, the hip flexors can get very tight and weak.Many of the best butt-building exercises, like squats and deadlifts, require a certain amount of hip flexor strength for you to successfully pull your hips into flexion. So a good deep hip flexor stretch, followed by some kind of challenge is ideal.

Many of the best butt-building exercises, like squats and deadlifts, require a certain amount of hip flexor strength for you to successfully pull your hips into flexion, so a good, deep hip flexor stretch is ideal.

You better be prepared to get a whole lot better at all your movements. You want glutes of glory? Well, child, you best listen to your reigning glute goddess to get to the promised land

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